Avoiding Agile Anarchy

Agile project management

Conventional Agile Methodology Wisdom lists three factors that define an Agile-ready project:

  1. High Uniqueness
  2. High Complexity
  3. Aggressive Deadlines

After using these three parameters to select your first agile project, there is still legwork to be done before sprints are humming along.

Many agile initiatives are announced by fiat with the team structure, sprint length and other basic rules of the road mandated by the Agile Initiative Sponsor. They dive right into development sprints, gathering user stories along the way to build a backlog. Here are some ways this approach could backfire:

  • In a rigid, hierarchical organization, the ability of teams to self-organize is often historically non-existent, and the change management hurdle might be a gap too big to jump. There are many ways that interoffice personalities and politics can sink an agile initiative in its early stages, or at any point along the way.
  • Complex, unique projects require some upfront work on architecture before the development sprints can begin. Agile teams can best manage this by making the first few sprints architecture sprints. Time and again, we have seen horror stories when the overall design or architecture is glossed over:
    • Parallel agile teams within a business design disparate UI’s to enable functionality that is essentially the same, but serves the needs of one particular product group. Before long, it’s obvious that external stakeholders are confused and put off by having to remember two different ways of interacting with the same company
    • User stories are taken down as the basis for development sprints, but they fail to consider the secondary stakeholders. BI reporting needs are often missed.
    • Prioritization of the backlog is driven by business need, without any attention to building foundational pieces first, then layering on transactions.

In short, Agile without Architecture leads to Anarchy, and a lasting bad impression that will taint future Agile efforts. It’s best to look before you leap and take time to address any Agile readiness gaps.

 

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