dragon

Digital Insurance – The Myth of the Online Buyer

The insurance industry is currently dealing with digital disruption, and by disruption I’m talking about the change in the consumer and the consumer habits, what I call The New Face of Insurance.

The myth that the insurance consumer is not ready for the digital world must be dispelled. According to The surprising facts about who shops online and on mobile (Business Insider 2015):

  • One in four shoppers is actually over the age of 55
  • Millennials make up the largest portion of online shoppers in terms of dollars spent and yet they earn the least

According to Gartner, 43% of our industry revenue will come directly from digital markets by 2020. Now think about that in our current captive and broker world.

LIMRA says that:

  • 74% of insurance customers want to do research online, educate themselves before they even think about talking to an agent
  • 25% of those people will even buy online, right there and then
  • Sadly, that’s really not available in our industry

We went from captive agents to independent agents and now we’re moving to more of a I-want-to-be-my-own-agent.

An example of this would be a UK company by the name of Beagle Street. They’re attacking the old ways that we do things, attacking the old financial advisers. And what they’re saying is “come and buy online.” So how do we go with this?

Digital Strategy and Digital Footprint website redesign. It’s way more than that. It’s about continually evolving to make it easier for consumers to do business with you. You need to go where your consumers are – you can no longer expect your consumers to come to you.

It’s looking at multi-channel distribution; embracing your agents, embracing online, and embracing the education that people are looking for. Just think about the customer service improvements t by being able to reach out to them through social media when there is a catastrophe.

We’ve been invited to speak on this topic at insurance conferences a lot recently, and we’ve done a short video as well. If you’d like to learn more, contact us.

What’s new in SharePoint 2016

SharePoint 2016 is finally here and we wanted to share some of the highlights. There are a few major improvements over SharePoint 2013, and some caveats to watch out for.

General Direction:

Microsoft has good reason to want everyone to get on the Office365 cloud bandwagon:

  • No more upgrade cycle
  • Ongoing fixes and improvements
  • Integration with other Microsoft tools
  • And of course, per user monthly subscription revenue

In reality, we see two hurdles for a large number of companies waiting to get onto the cloud version – the ability to control your environment, and having your data  at someone else’s mercy – not everyone is comfortable with either of these.

SharePoint 2016 is aimed at exactly this audience and provides 3 major areas of improvement:

  1. Catch-up with many platform improvements released to the cloud in the last 3 years
  2. Improvements in hybrid environment support, allowing companies that have some cloud footprint and legacy on-prem farm a way to provide a more seamless user experience
  3. Mobile friendly user interface
  4. Improved encryption standards

The full list of new features from Microsoft

Key features worth highlighting:

Hybrid environment support:

hybrid

While the Hybrid option does officially exist in SP2013 it has quite a few limitations that made it difficult to use. SharePoint 2016 adds the ability to follow SharePoint Server and SharePoint Online sites, and see them consolidated in a single list. Users will now have a single profile in Office 365, where all of their profile information is stored (although it is not a 2 way sync).

Most importantly, search can now include both on-prem and Office 365 sites.

Microsoft’s view is still assuming Office 365 is your primary environment and the on-prem is legacy that has to be supported for now, but these new features make a hybrid solution much better for users.

Mobile user interface:

mobile

A new and improved mobile interface is a very welcome upgrade. While it is not a completely responsive experience, the OOTB use is much better and can be more easily customized using Bootstrap to be responsive.

Improved Security

SharePoint 2016 now supports TLS 1.2 by default. SP13 required TLS1.0 to work properly and we have many customers who wanted to turn that off but could not. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt346121(v=office.16).aspx#encrypted

 Deprecated features

A few important notes about deprecated features:

  • There is no longer a free version. The WSS/Foundation free version has been around for a very long time and enabled small companies or teams to use SharePoint for free. There will not be an equivalent for SP16 so companies that currently use SP Foundation will need to migrate either to a Standard version of SP16 or to office 365.
  • Some 3rd party integrations will no longer be available. The SAP module (Duet) will not be supported. SalesForce also has shared with us that they have no intention of upgrading their SP2013 integration. They clearly see the direction Microsoft is taking in moving everyone to the cloud and do not see a future in supporting future on-prem installs.
  • Excel services will require an online office server in order to work.
  • Lastly, the seldom used Notes and Tags are formally gone.

Final thoughts

Microsoft is very clear about SP16 being a transitional product in the path towards cloud. It will support customers who are not yet ready to make the leap but will emphasize the hybrid options. More and more capabilities will start to depend on the cloud (like Excel services) and 3rd parties will stop supporting the on-prem installation. The future is clearly in the cloud so if you are on an older on-prem version and thinking about an upgrade, check the cloud version first and only if it is not a viable option for your organization consider the on-prem/hybrid options.

Productivity-for-PR

You can rescue a failing IT project

If you work in the IT world, you’ve probably seen projects that have come off the rails and require a major course correction to get back on track. In this blog post, I will highlight the warning signs of a failing project from a recent client, along with the process we follow to get critical initiatives back on track.

Danger ahead!

This client was replacing an important legacy system as part of a long-term modernization program. The project had been in danger from the start:

  • High IT team turnover rate led to new hires that didn’t know the business
  • No strong project management on the team
  • Selected this project to initiate an Agile development approach
  • No Product Owner to represent the needs of the business

After two years only one major module had been delivered and the updated project timeline was three times longer than the original schedule. The alarming and unexpected extension of the timeline was the motivation our client needed to contact Edgewater for help.

Project Assessment

Our first step was to conduct an assessment of the project to better understand:

  • Major risks
  • Staffing and capabilities
  • The estimation approach
  • User involvement
  • Agile adoption

In this case, the findings clearly indicated a project at a high risk of failure.

Recommendations

Given the determination of “high risk”, Edgewater recommended some bold changes:

  • Establishing a realistic project schedule with achievable milestones
  • Hiring a full-time Product Owner to lead the requirements effort and build the backlog
  • Doubling the size of the IT development team to increase productivity and reduce the timeline
  • Using a blended team of full-time resources and consultants
  • Adding a full-time Project Manager/Scrum Master to lead the Agile development team, keep the project on schedule, and provide reporting to senior management

Initial results

After the first six months, the results are very promising:Productivity-for-PR

  • The project timeline has been cut in half
  • The development team has increased productivity by over 50% and has delivered modules on schedule
  • The requirements backlog has doubled
  • The client IT team is learning best practices so they will be able to support and enhance the system on their own
  • The Project Manager is mentoring the team on Agile roles and responsibilities, and managing the development team

Our client is extremely happy with the productivity improvements, and the users are excited to work on this project.  There’s still a long way to go, but the project rescue has been a success.

To learn more, watch our video then contact kparks@edgewater.com.

bittercube-products

Lean Manufacturing in Practice – Bittercube

bittercube-productsIn this blog series, I’m showcasing products manufactured in my home state of Wisconsin. In addition to sharing some fun facts about the various companies and their products, I’ll be highlighting the Lean Manufacturing Principles that are best exhibited at each respective organization. These principles are derived from the Japanese manufacturing industry and center on making obvious what adds value while reducing waste muda. The six Lean Manufacturing Principles are: 1) Workplace safety, order, and cleanliness 2) Just in Time (JIT) production 3) Six Sigma quality 4) Empowered Teams 5) Visual Management 6) Pursuit of Perfection.

A cocktail renaissance has swept across the country, inspiring a new fascination with the ingredients, techniques, and traditions that make the American cocktail so special. The use of bitters, liquor that is flavored with the pungent taste of plant extracts, has been gaining popularity over the past decade. Originally developed for medicinal and digestive purposes, bitters now serve mainly as cocktail flavorings. The alcohol functions as a solvent for botanical extracts as well as a preservative.

Milwaukee has contributed to this cocktail renaissance with the help of Bittercube. Founded by Nicholas Kosevich and Ira Koplowitz in 2009, Bittercube handcrafts eight varieties of artisanal bitters, using only naturally sourced ingredients. By happenstance, the operations are run from the location that Foamation once occupied. Milwaukee was perceived as an untapped market with room to grow. Also, the low cost of operating expenses allow for maximum revenue generation.

Henry Ford created the first all-inclusive manufacturing strategy. However, it was Eiji Toyoda, a Japanese engineer, who after analyzing Ford’s methods, improved upon them by keeping an eye out for waste. Waste (or muda in Japanese) refers to any kind of wasted motion, effort or materials in the manufacturing process. Toyoda popularized the concept of Reducing Waste, which has become a basic tenet of Lean Manufacturing and falls under the principle of Pursuit of Perfection.

The objective of Lean is that every step must add value and be waste-free. A non-value added, or wasteful activity is one that neither adds value to the customer nor provides a competitive advantage to the organization.  Some non-value added activities include waiting and inappropriate processing. Waste can also take a tangible form, such as idle raw material or defects. Although transportation is an important aspect of the manufacturing process, it is a non-value added activity, as it adds to cost but not to value. It should be noted that some non-value adding activities like accounting and regulations are important and cannot be avoided.

Lean-manufacturing-bwThe continuous Pursuit of Perfection encompasses the idea that one must always strive to eliminate waste in the organization, while constantly making improvements, even if those improvements are small and incremental.  Improving processes results in reducing or eliminating variation, and improving the process flow or speed. Learning and consistent measures for improvement should be part of all processes if an organization intends on growing.

Bittercube has reduced waste by improving on their processes. In the past, they used a generic, high-density plastic container to process the bitters. There was no way to remove the botanical material after the batch was processed, other than to climb into the container and physically remove it by hand. Although this left the person who cleaned the container smelling of cinnamon, cloves, and vanilla, it wasted time and did not add value to the process. They have since updated to a custom-built processing/cooking tank with a bottom compartment where botanical material can easily be removed and cleaned.

Bittercube previously used generic boxes that weren’t cost efficient to ship. They have since opted for custom-made boxes with dimensions that maximize the number of bottles in each box, thus reducing wasted space and shipping costs.

Lean supports the notion that nothing should be wasted and a use must be found for everything. Bittercube has also reduced tangible/physical waste by reusing and recycling the processed materials. Instead of discarding the used botanicals, Bittercute has begun composting these materials. The finer botanical sediment will be reused in other products, such as an ingredient for Purple Door Ice Cream.

Autumn is upon us! Try this seasonal Maple Old Fashioned recipe!

2 oz. Johnny Drum Private Stock Bourbon, Fat .25oz. Maple Syrup, a dash of Jamaican #2 Bitters, a dash of Bittercube Bolivar Bitters, Garnish: Fat orange peel

To view other recipes and product offerings, visit Bittercube.

To read more about bitters, visit The History of Bitters

For more information on Lean Manufacturing see: Lean Waste Stream by Marc Jensen, Lean Enterprise: A Synergistic Approach to Minimizing Waste by William A. Levinson and Raymond A. Rerick, and Learning to See: Value Stream Mapping to Create Value and Eliminate MUDA by Mike Rother and John Shook

RHA blog cover

Ranzal Healthcare Analytics (RHA) Productivity Management Overview

In this brief demo, you’ll see how to leverage your interactive dashboard to drill down by department, by pay period, by job code, by employee, by any productivity metric you gather, to support and enhance your day-to-day labor management activities.

Cheesehead Logo_TRANS_200wide

Lean Manufacturing in Practice – Foamation

HiResLogoOriginal

In this blog series I will be showcasing products manufactured in my home state of Wisconsin. In addition to sharing some fun facts about the various companies and their products, I’ll be highlighting the Lean Manufacturing Principles that are best exhibited at each respective organization. These principles are derived from the Japanese manufacturing industry and center on making obvious what adds value while reducing waste muda. The six Lean Manufacturing Principles are: 1) Workplace safety, order, and cleanliness 2) Just in Time (JIT) production 3) Six Sigma quality 4) Empowered Teams 5) Visual Management 6) Pursuit of Perfection.

When you tell someone that you’re from Wisconsin, it’s almost certain that you’ll be associated will be the iconic Cheesehead® hat, worn by devoted Green Bay Packer fans. In the mid-1980’s the term “cheesehead” started being used to describe Wisconsinites at baseball games. Rather than be insulted by this term, Ralph Bruno, founder and owner of Foamation, decided to embrace and reappropriate the concept. He cut up his mother’s couch, and the first foam Cheesehead hat was born. For nearly thirty years, Foamation has been producing Cheesehead hats (along with a wide array of foam merchandise). If you placed Cheesehead hats back to back, they would stretch across America and into the sea!

Although the Cheesehead hat still leads in sales (especially during football season), this company continues to add new items to their product offerings, along with fulfilling high quantities of custom orders. “Even though we’re associated (not officially, but in some consumer’s minds) with the Green Bay Packers, you don’t have to like the Packers to like our brand. What other fun, goofy, silly thing can we do?” stated Production Manager, Mario Busalacchi. Should you already own a Cheesehead hat, you could purchase other headgear or accoutrement, such as: a baseball hat, cowboy hat, hanging dice, tie, bad-call brick, fireman hat, or ice cream hat in chocolate, strawberry, or mint chip.

Lean ManufacturingThe factory floor is the core of any manufacturing company, but a lean factory alone does not make a lean enterprise. There are also other functions that support manufacturing and contribute to the Lean Pursuit of Perfection. Design Engineering falls under this general category and includes the following attributes: Designing for Manufacturability (DFM), Being Reasonable about Critical Parameters, Having Knowledge of Logistics and the Need for Standardization, Driving New Product Design from Marketplace Needs, and Shortening the Design Process all while considering the Voice of the Customer (VOC).  (For more on VOC, see: Critical to Quality Trees, Kano Analysis, and Customer Segmentation.)

Lean companies include the customer in new product decisions so as to avoid wasting design efforts on an undesired product that will flop. In order to embody the Pursuit of Perfection principle, companies must constantly strive for improvement with an anti-waste mindset and understand that the organization exists primarily to provide value to its customers.

Foamation pursues perfection by constantly evolving and enhancing their products based on customer feedback. Through online analytics, social media, and general observations, this company identifies opportunities and sets the development process in motion. Foamation discovered that there were opportunities to better serve women and children by producing products geared toward their preferences.  Women who would rather not wear a foam hat, now have the option of showing off their brand loyalty through other products such as Cheesehead earrings, and children now have the option of wearing a smaller version of the Cheesehead hat.

Foamation is also aware of the importance of technology in their customers’ lives. They are Driving New Product Design from Marketplace Needs by offering NFCheese key chains and necklaces that have Near Field Communication tags embedded within the foam. With this Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, fans can converge their digitally enhanced Cheesehead product with their mobile device.

Here’s to a great season…Go Packers!

To view all of the Cheesehead products, visit Cheesehead.com.

For more information on Lean Manufacturing see: Learning to See by Mike Rother and John Shook, published by The Lean Enterprise Institute (www.lean.org), The Lean Turnaround by Art Byrne, and Creating a Kaizen Culture by Jon Miller, Mike Wroblewski, and Jaime Villafuerte.

Project Management Methodology

Projects are like a box of chocolates

How many of us remember the famous quote from Forrest Gump, “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.”? Being assigned a project is a little like that box of chocolates – you never know what you are getting until you take that first bite. A project is like taking that first bite of chocolate – unique, but having enough similarities to fit inside the chocolate box.

  • How do you determine the best methodology when you start a project?
  • Do you have a PMO that dictates the methodology?
  • Are you in a company that has adopted Agile as its methodology?
  • Are you using Waterfall?
  • Or, as the project manager, do you have the authority to determine the best methodology for the project based on its assigned team, scope, timeline and cost?

Like that box of chocolates, each project might be unique, but it still needs to work within an agreed upon methodology that is flexible enough to support small to large, complex projects. If the methodology cannot handle the flexibility, it needs to be re-evaluated to support all project types within the organization.

Create a project methodology that supports all project types by defining the critical project artifacts for each project type (e.g., small, medium, large). At the end of the project, perform an analysis of the project and determine what worked \ did not work, and adjust the project artifacts to suit the project.

How?

  1. Determine the methodology framework – Agile, Waterfall, WaterScrumFall (blend of Agile & Waterfall).
  2. Define what artifacts are needed for each project type – then map the processes using a tool such as Visio and share the process with others.
  3. Projects are more than producing documentation because that is what the PMO dictates – involve and evolve your PMO to a strategic partner.
  4. Provide feedback to continuously improve the process.

Projects are like those chocolates. We can savor each project’s unique flavor and make each a success if we follow a standardized approach that can also flex to support the uniqueness of each project. The approach should be like the chocolate box, able to accommodate each unique shape within a larger, coherent framework. Our job is to understand the uniqueness of the chocolate while appreciate the box in which it sits.

customer segmentation

Voice of the Customer – Customer Segmentation

When it comes to predicting customer behavior, historical sales data may contain critical clues. Who are repeat customers for a product or service? Have all segments of the target customers been identified? Segmentation is used to divide customers into groups based on their demographics, attitudes, or buying behaviors and target the specific groups with a message that will best resonate with them. The more you know about a customer, the easier it is to predict their behavior.

During this season of prediction making, you may want to consider playing the popular German game of Bleigießen “lead pouring,” in which your future is foretold through lead shapes. A spoon with a small amount of lead is held over a flame until the lead melts. The melted lead is then quickly poured into a bowl of water. Upon contact with water, the lead solidifies and forms a unique shape. The shape of the cooled lead is then compared to a list of meanings.

You might not have any control over shape formation (i.e. fish “Fisch” = luck “Glück” vs. cross “Kreuz” = death “Tod”), or what personal changes will manifest in 2015, but one area in which you may have some control is in increasing your company’s profitability. By implementing Customer Segmentation, a Voice of the Customer tool within Six Sigma methodology, you’re able to zero in on target customers who create the highest value and ultimately increase your profitability and bottom line.

What Does it Do?

Customer Segmentation identifies and focuses on subgroups of customers who create the highest value and prioritizes efforts to allocate appropriate marketing resources. Companies oftentimes neglect or miss opportunities because they treat all customers as bringing equal value or fail to understand the economic, descriptive, and attitudinal criteria of their core business.

Segmentation criteria can include:

  • Economic (revenue, frequency of purchase, loyalty, company size, etc.)
  • Descriptive (geographic location, demographics, industry)
  • Attitudinal (price, service, value)

The following Bleigießen examples exhibit segmentation criteria:

Customer segmentationShape 1. Ring “Ringe” = Marriage “Hochzeit”

Customers can be segmented demographically by marriage status (single, married, divorced). Married couples often have distinctly different purchasing behaviors compared to single consumers. This can relate to purchases such as cars, financial products, or holiday entertainment. For example, travel agencies would not offer similar holiday packages for bachelors and married couples.

customer segmentationShape 2. Mouse “Maus” = to be thrifty / economical “sparsam sein”

Customers can be segmented by purchasing power or behavior. These customers could be segmented demographically through social class (lower, middle, upper). Social class is a term linked to education, tradition, income (low, medium, high) and parenting. Alternatively, customers could be segmented attitudinally through values or lifestyle (conservative, economical, trendy). If your target customer is upper class, marketing via coupons will be a waste of time for a group indifferent to saving a few dollars.

customer segmentationShape 3. Bell “Glocke” / Egg “Ei” = Birth announcement “Ankündigung einer Geburt”

Customers can be segmented demographically through family size (couple only, small family, large family) and family lifecycle (young married no kids, married young kids). Customers can also be segmented attitudinally through needs or motivations (convenience, value, safety). If you’re considering entering new markets/regions and your target customers are children, you may want to avoid certain European countries, such as Spain, where there are 1.4 children per female.

How to Do It:

  • Identify the product or service being analyzed
  • Brainstorm to identify customers
  • Identify segmentation characteristics
  • Develop profiles of the segments
  • When gathering information, include members from each segment
  • Document results
Product/Services (Output) Customers Potential Segments
BleigließenGame  US Customers West Coast
East Coast
European Customers Western Europe
Eastern Europe

 Benefits of Tool:

  • Understanding customer segments and segment behavior can help tailor marketing and sales strategies
  • Reach profitability goals by demoting customers who don’t generate value
  • Formalizing segment profiles provides a common language

For related blogs that cover additional VOC tools:

Google search

Google to penalize non mobile sites

Google has just announced that starting April 21st, websites that are not mobile friendly will be penalized in mobile search results. Seems like a no-brainer, if you are using your phone to do a search, it is easier to view information and take action if the site you go to is mobile friendly.

With more than 25% of searches now being done on mobile devices (BIA/Kelsey (April 2014)), companies that have not yet created a mobile or responsive site can expect a traffic hit in the next few months.

In addition to better search placement, mobile, responsive and adaptive sites also lead to higher call percentage and from several implementations we’ve seen, a huge improvement in abandonment rates. It seems users on mobile devices that get to a site that is not mobile friendly would just rather go somewhere else.

In the blog post, Google also provides some guidelines and testing tools to check your site compliance.

Tip: not highly publicized, but Chrome browser includes a great mobile testing tool. In the Menu under “More Tools” there is an option for Developer Tools. These allow for selection of device for output and changing the HTTP header data to test using different devices.

Patient Panel Analytics

In a recent interview with a provider about how to gain some efficiencies in her practice, I asked how many patients she was caring for with a diagnosis of cancer in the past few years. After a “from the hip” answer, I showed her a report from one of her payers, and she became frustrated that the payer had a better summary of her patients than she could obtain from her own EHR.

Healthcare providers and management need to be empowered with tools to analyze information about their practice in which much effort is spent creating the data.

This podcast will demonstrate our Accountable Care Analytics Application’s ability to define patient panels and provide integrated summaries of patient information from clinical and claims data sources.