Cloud Computing: Where is the Killer App?

As an avid reader, I have read too many articles lately about how the bleak economy was going to drive more IT teams to use cloud computing. The real question: what are the proper applications for Cloud Computing? For the more conservative IT leader, there must be a starting point that isn’t throwing one of your mission-critical applications into the cloud.

One of the best applications of cloud computing that I have seen implemented recently is content management software. One of the challenges with content management is that it is difficult to predict the ultimate storage needs. If the implementation is very successful, the storage needs start small and immediately zoom into hundreds of gigabytes as users learn to store spreadsheets, drawings, video and other key corporate documents. Open source content management software can be deployed quickly on cloud computing servers and the cost of storage will ramp up in line with the actual usage. Instead of guessing what the processor needs and storage will be, the IT leader can simply start the implementation and the cloud computing environment will scale as needed. My suggestion is to combine wiki, content management and Web 2.0 project management tools running in the cloud computing space for your next major software implementation project or large corporate project.

A second “killer” application for cloud computing is software development and testing. One of the headaches and major costs for software development is the infamous need for multiple environments for developing and testing. This need is compounded when your development team is using Agile development methodologies and the testing department is dealing with daily builds. The cloud computing environment provides a low-cost means of quickly “spinning up” a development environment and multiple test environments. This use of the cloud  is especially beneficial for web-based development, and testing load balancing for high traffic web sites. The ability to “move up” on processor speeds, number of processors, memory and storage helps establish real baselines for when the software project moves to actual production versus the traditional SWAG approach. The best part is that once the development is complete, the cloud computing environment can be scaled back to maintenance mode and there isn’t unused hardware waiting for re-deployment.

The third “killer” application is data migration. Typically, an IT leader will need large processing and storage needs for a short term, to rapidly migrate data from an older application to a new one. Before the cloud, companies would rent hardware, use it briefly and ship it back to vendor. The issue was guessing the necessary CPU power and storage needs to meet the time constraints for the dreaded cut-over date. The scalability of the cloud computing environment reduces the hardware cost for data migrations and allows flexibility for quickly adding processors on that all important weekend. There is simply no hardware to dispose of when the migration is complete. Now that is a “killer” application in my humble opinion. By the way, cloud computing would be an excellent choice for re-platforming an application, too, especially if the goal is to make the application scaleable.

In summary, if your IT team has a short term hardware need, then carefully consider cloud computing as a cost effective alternative. In the process, you might discover your “killer app” for cloud computing.

One thought on “Cloud Computing: Where is the Killer App?

  1. Pingback: Posts about Web 2.0 as of January 9, 2009 | The Lessnau Lounge

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