Cloud Computing Trends: Thinking Ahead (Part 1)

cloud-burstThe aim of this three part series is to gain insight into the capabilities of cloud computing, some of the major vendors involved, and assessment of their offerings.  This series will help you assess whether cloud computing makes sense for your organization today and how it can help or hurt you. The first part focuses on defining cloud computing and its various flavors, the second part focuses on offerings from some of the major players, and the third part talks about how it can be used today and possible future directions.

Today cloud computing and its sub-categories do not have precise definitions. Different groups and companies define them in different and overlapping ways. While it is hard to find a single useful definition of the term “cloud computing” it is somewhat easier to dissect some of its better known sub-categories such as:

  • SaaS (software as a service)
  • PaaS (platform as a service)
  • IaaS (infrastructure as a service)
  • HaaS (hardware as a service)

Among these categories SaaS is the most well known, since it has been around for a while, and enjoys a well established reputation as a solid way of providing enterprise quality business software and services. Well known examples include: SalesForce.com, Google Apps, SAP, etc. HaaS is the older term used to describe IaaS and is typically considered synonymous with IaaS.  Compared to SaaS, PaaS and IaaS are relatively new, less understood, and less used today. In this series we will mostly focus on PaaS on IaaS as the up and coming forms of cloud computing for the enterprise.

The aim of IaaS is to abstract away the hardware (network, servers, etc.) and allow applications to run virtual instances of servers without ever touching a piece of hardware. PaaS takes the abstraction further eliminates the need to worry about the operating system and other foundational software. If the aim of virtualization is to make a single large computer appear as multiple small dedicated computers, one of the aims of PaaS is to make multiple computers appear as one and make it simple to scale from a single server to many. PaaS aims to abstract away the complexity of the platform and allow your application to automatically scale as the load grows without worrying about adding more servers, disks, or bandwidth. PaaS presents significant benefits for companies that are poised for aggressive organic growth or growth by acquisition.
cloud-computing-diagram

Cloud Computing: Abstraction Layers

So which category/abstraction level (IaaS, Paas, SaaS) of the cloud is right for you? The answer to this question depends on many factors such as: what kind of applications your organization runs on (proprietary vs. commodity), the development stage of these applications (legacy vs. newly developed), time and cost of deployment (immediate/low, long/high), scalability requirements (low vs. high), and vendor lock-in (low vs. high). PaaS is highly suited for applications that inherently have seasonal or highly variable demand and thus require high degree of scalability.  However, PaaS may require a major rewrite or redesign of the application to fit the vendor’s framework and as a result it may cost more and cause vendor lock-in. IaaS is great if your application’s scalability needs are predictable and can be fully satisfied with a single instance. SaaS has been a tried and true way of getting access to software and services that follow industry standards. If you are looking for a good CRM, HR management, or leads management system, etc. your best bet is to go with a SaaS vendor. The relative strengths and weaknesses of these categories are summarized in the following table.

 

App Type

Prop. vs. Commodity

Scalability

 

Vendor

Lock-in

Development Stage

Time & Cost

(of deployment)

IaaS

Proprietary

Low

Low

Late/Legacy

Low

PaaS

Proprietary

High

High

Early

High

SaaS

Commodity

High

High

NA

Low

Cloud Computing: Category Comparison

3 thoughts on “Cloud Computing Trends: Thinking Ahead (Part 1)

  1. Pingback: Cloud Computing Links March 24, 2009 at Cloud Curious

  2. Pingback: Cloud Computing « Future Trends in Computing

  3. Pingback: IT Cost Cutting and Revenue Enhancing Projects « Edgewater Technology Weblog

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