Data Darwinism – Capabilities that provide a competitive advantage

In my previous post, I introduced the concept of Data Darwinism, which states that for a company to be the ‘king of the jungle’ (and remain so), they need to have the ability to continually innovate.   Let’s be clear, though.   Innovation must be aligned with the strategic goals and objectives of the company.   The landscape is littered with examples of innovative ideas that didn’t have a market.  

So that begs the question “What are the behaviors and characteristics of companies that are at the top of the food chain?”    The answer to that question can go in many different directions.   With respect to Data Darwinism, the following hierarchy illustrates the categories of capabilities that an organization needs to demonstrate to truly become a dominant force.

Foundational

The impulse will be for an organization to want to immediately jump to implementing capabilities that they think will allow them to be at the top of the pyramid.   And while this is possible to a certain extent, you must put in place certain foundational capabilities to have a sustainable model.     Examples of capabilities at this level include data integration, data standardization, data quality, and basic reporting.

Without clean, integrated, accurate data that is aligned with the intended business goals, the ability to implement the more advanced capabilities is severely limited.    This does not mean that all foundational capabilities must be implemented before moving on to the next level.  Quite the opposite actually.   You must balance the need for the foundational components with the return that the more advanced capabilities will enable.

Transitional

Transitional capabilities are those that allow an organization to move from silo’d, isolated, often duplicative efforts to a more ‘centralized’ platform in which to leverage their data.    Capabilities at this level of the hierarchy start to migrate towards an enterprise view of data and include such things as a more complete, integrated data set, increased collaboration, basic analytics and ‘coordinated governance’.

Again, you don’t need to fully instantiate the capabilities at this level before building capabilities at the next level.   It continues to be a balancing act.

Transformational

Transformational capabilities are those that allow the company to start to truly differentiate themselves from their competition.   It doesn’t fully deliver the innovative capabilities that set them head and shoulders above other companies, but rather sets the stage for such.   This stage can be challenging for organizations as it can require a significant change in mind-set compared to the current way its conducts its operations.   Capabilities at this level of the hierarchy include more advanced analytical capabilities (such as true data mining), targeted access to data by users, and ‘managed governance’.

Innovative

Innovative capabilities are those that truly set a company apart from its competitors.   They allow for innovative product offerings, unique methods of handling the customer experience and new ways in which to conduct business operations.   Amazon is a great example of this.   Their ability to customize the user experience and offer ‘recommendations’ based on a wealth of user buying  trend data has set them apart from most other online retailers.    Capabilities at this level of the hierarchy include predictive analytics, enterprise governance and user self-service access to data.

The bottom line is that moving up the hierarchy requires vision, discipline and a pragmatic approach.   The journey is not always an easy one, but the rewards more than justify the effort.

Check back for the next installment of this series “Data Darwinism – Evolving Your Data Environment.”

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