Healthcare Analytics – A Proven Return on Investment: So What’s Taking So Long?

So what do you get when you keep all your billing data in one place, your OR management data in another, materials management in another, outcomes and quality in another, and time and labor in yet another? The answer is…………..over 90% of the operating rooms in America!

That’s right; the significant majority of operating rooms DO NOT have an integrated data infrastructure. In the simplest terms, that means that the average OR Director/Administrator CAN’T give answers to questions like, “of all orthopedic surgeons performing surgery within your organization (single or multi-facility), what surgeon performs total knee replacements with the lowest case duration, least number of staff, lowest rate of complication, infection, and re-admission rate at the lowest material and implant cost with the highest rate of reimbursement?” In other words, they can’t tell you who their highest quality, most profitable, least risky, least costly, best performing surgeon is in their highest revenue surgical specialty. Yes, I’m telling you that they can’t distinguish the good from the bad, the ugly from the, well, uglier, and the 2.5 star from the 5 star. Are you still wondering why there is such a strong push for transparency of healthcare data to the average consumer?

You’re sitting there asking yourself, “Why can’t they answer questions like whose the least costly, most profitable and highest quality surgeon?” and the answer is simple, “application-oriented analysis”. Hospitals have yet to realize the benefits of healthcare analytics. That is, the ability to analyze information that comes from multiple sources in one location, instead of trying to coordinate each individual system analyst and have them hand their spreadsheet off to the other analyst that then adds in her data and massages it just right to hand it off to the next guy, and then….ugh you get the point. If vendors like McKesson, Cerner, and Epic could make revenue off of sharing data and “playing well with others” they would, but right now they don’t. They make their money off of deploying their own individual solutions that may or may not integrate well with other applications like imaging, labs, pharmacy, electronic documentation, etc. They will all tell you that their systems integrate, but only once you’ve signed their contract and read that most of the time, it requires their own expertise to build interfaces, so you’ll need to pay for one of their consultants to come do that for you – just ask anyone who has McKesson Nursing Documentation how long it takes to upgrade the system or how easy it is to integrate with their OR Management system so floor nurses can have the data they need on their computer screen when the patient arrives directly from surgery. Out of the box integrated functionality/capability? Easy-to-read, well documented interface specifications that a DBA or programmer could script to? Apple plug-n-play convenience? Not now, not in healthcare.

Don’t get too upset though, there are plenty of opportunities to fix this broken system. First, understand that organizations such as Edgewater Technology have built ways to integrate data from multiple systems and guess what – we integrated 5 OR systems in a 7 hospital system and they saved $5M within the first 12 months of using the solution, realizing a ROI 4 times their original cost.  Can it be done? We proved it can. So what is taking so long for others to realize the same level of cost savings, quality improvement and operational efficiency? I don’t know, you tell me? But don’t give me the “it’s not on our list of top priorities this year” or the “patient satisfaction and quality mandates are consuming all our resources” or don’t forget the “we’re too busy with meaningful use” excuses. Why? Because all of these would be achievable objectives if you could first understand and make sense of the data you’re collecting outside the myopic lens you’ve been looking through for the past 30 years. Wake up! This isn’t rocket science, we’re trying to do now what Gordon Gekko and Wall Street bankers were doing in the 80’s – data warehousing, business intelligence, and whatever other flashy words you want to call it – plain and simple, it’s integrating data to make better sense of your business operations. And until we start running healthcare like it’s a business, we’re going to continue to sacrifice quality for volume. Are you still wondering why Medicare is broke?

5 thoughts on “Healthcare Analytics – A Proven Return on Investment: So What’s Taking So Long?

  1. Pingback: So You’ve Signed an Alternative Quality Contract (AQC), Now What? « Edgewater Technology Weblog

  2. Pingback: So You Think an Accountable Care Organization (ACO) is a Good Idea – First Things First, What’s your Data Look Like? « Edgewater Technology Weblog

  3. Pingback: Why are YOU going to the OR Management Conference this year? « Edgewater Technology Weblog

  4. Pingback: What I Learned at Health Connect Partners Surgery Conference 2012: Most Hospitals Still Can’t Tell What Surgeries Turn a Profit | Edgewater Technology Weblog

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