The Never-Ending Burden of Reporting Patient Safety & Quality Metrics

Quick: how long does it take you to collect, aggregate, and report your SCIP, PN, AMI, and HF Core Measures? How about infection control metrics like rates of CLABSI, VAP, UTI, and MRSA? Or for that matter, any patient safety and quality metric that is mandated by JCAHO, CMS, your Department of Health, or anyone else? If you answered anything less than 2 months, and if I was a betting man, I’d bet you were lying.

There is a never-ending burden strapped to the backs of hospitals to collect, aggregate, analyze, validate, re-analyze, re-validate, report, re-validate, report again….quality measures. Reporting of these quality metrics is meant to benchmark institutions across the industry on their level of care, and inform patients of their treatment options. Fortunately for the majority of institutions, it is not difficult to achieve a high rate of compliance (>80-90%) because clinicians genuinely want to provide the best standards of care. Unfortunately though, the standards for achieving the highest designation according to CMS guidelines (achieving top percentile >99%) requires hospitals to allocate a disproportionate amount of time, money, and people to increase very small increments of compliance. I sat with a SCIP Nurse Abstractor last week and we spent 90 minutes drawing out, on 2 consecutive white boards, the entire process from start to finish of reporting SCIP core measures. There are over 50 steps, 5 spreadsheets/files, 4 hand-offs, 3 committees, and a partridge in a pear tree. It takes 2.5 months. I wonder how much money that is if you were to translate that time and effort into hard money spent? I also wonder what the return on investment is for that time, effort, and money. If we’re going to start running healthcare like a business, which I argue we should, this seems like a great place to start.

STEP 1: Reduce the amount of time spent on this process by ensuring the data is trustworthy There are way too many “validation” steps. Most people do not trust the data they’re given, and therefore end up re-validating according to their own unique way of massaging the data.

STEP 2: Integrate data from multiple sources so your Quality Abstractors and Analysts aren’t searching in 10 different places for the information they need. I’m currently helping a client implement interfaces for surgery, general lab, microbiology, blood bank, and pharmacy into their quality reporting system so their analysts can find all the information they need to report infection rates, core measures, and patient safety metrics. In addition, we built a Business Objects universe on top of the quality data store and they can do dynamic reporting in near real time. The amount of time saved is amazing and we have been successful in dramatically shifting the type of work these people are responsible for. The BI Capability Maturity Model below depicts our success helping them move from left to right.

STEP 3: Empower your analysts. With much more time to actually analyze the information, these people are the best candidates to help find errors in the data, delays in the process, and opportunities for improvement.

STEP 4: Create a mechanism for feedback based on the information you uncover. Both overachievers and underperformers alike need to be recognized for the appropriate reasons. Standardize on the best of what you find, and be sure to localize your intervention where the data is inaccurate or the process breaks down. This will also demonstrate greater transparency on your part.

5 thoughts on “The Never-Ending Burden of Reporting Patient Safety & Quality Metrics

  1. Pingback: The Struggle to Define Quality Measures: Try Finding the “True Source” of Your Data First « Edgewater Technology Weblog

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  4. Pingback: What I Learned Last Week in Cambridge, MA at the World Congress Health Care Quality Conference | Edgewater Technology Weblog

  5. Pingback: What I Learned at Health Connect Partners Surgery Conference 2012: Most Hospitals Still Can’t Tell What Surgeries Turn a Profit | Edgewater Technology Weblog

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