Why EMR’s Are Not Panacea’s for Healthcare’s Data Problems

So, you’ve decided to go with Epic or Centricity or Cerner for your organization’s EMR.

Think your EMR is Hamlin’s Wizard Oil?

Good, the first tough decision is out of the way. If you’re a medium to large size healthcare organization, you likely allocated a few million to a few hundred million dollars on your implementation over five to ten years. I will acknowledge that this is a significant investment, probably one of the largest in your organizations history (aside from a new expansion, but these implementations can easily surpass the cost of building a new hospital).  But I will argue: “Does that really mean the other initiatives you’ve been working should suddenly be put on hold, take a back seat, or even cease to exist?”Absolutely not. The significant majority of healthcare organizations (save a few top performers) are already years and almost a decade behind the rest of the world in adapting technology for improving the way the healthcare is delivered. How do I know this? Well, you tell me, “What other industry continues to publicly have 100,000 mistakes a year?” Okay, glad we now agree. So, are you really going to argue with me that being single-threaded, with a narrow focus on a new system implementation, is the only thing your organization can be committed to? If you’re answer is yes, I have some Cher cassette tapes, a transistor radio, a mullet, and some knee highs that should suit you well in your outdated mentality.

An EMR implementation is a game-changer. Every single one of your clinical workflows will be adjusted, electronic documentation will become the standard, and clinicians will be held accountable like never before for their interaction with the new system. Yes, it depends on what modules you buy – Surgery, IP, OP, scheduling, billing, and the list goes on. But for those of us in the data integration world, trying every day to convince healthcare leaders that turning data into information should be top of mind, this boils down to one basic principle – you have added yet another source of data to your already complex, disparate application landscape. Is it a larger data source than most? Yes. But does this mean you treat it any differently when considering its impact on the larger need for real time, accurate integrated enterprise data analysis? No. Very much no. Does it also mean that your people are suddenly ready to embrace this new technology and leverage all of its benefits? Probably not. Why? Because an EMR, contrary to popular belief, is not a panacea for the personal accountability and data problems in healthcare:

  • If you want to analyze any of the data from your EMR you still need to pull it into an enterprise data model with a solid master data foundation and structure to accommodate a lot more data than will just come from the system (how about materials management, imaging, research, quality, risk?)
    • And please don’t tell me your EMR is also your data warehouse because then you’re in much worse shape than I thought…
    • You’re not all of a sudden reporting real time. It will still take you way too long to produce those quality reports, service line dashboards, or <insert report name here>. Yes there is a real time feed available from the EMR back end database, but that doesn’t change the fact that there are still manual processes required for transforming some of this information, so a sound data quality and data governance strategy is critical BEFORE deploying such a huge, new system.

The list goes on. If you want to hear more, I’m armed to the teeth with examples of why an EMR implementation should be just that, a focused implementation. Yes it will require more resources, time and commitment, but don’t lose sight of the fact that there are plenty more things you needed to do with your data before the EMR came, and the same will be the case once your frenzied EMR-centric mentality is gone.

4 thoughts on “Why EMR’s Are Not Panacea’s for Healthcare’s Data Problems

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