Project Triage During Rapid Business Change Cycles

A few years ago, we ran a series of blog posts on project triage, diagnosis and rescue:

How often do you perform project triage?triage

Preparing for Project Rescue: Diagnosis

Restoring Projects to Peak Performance

In much of our work since then, we have been working with organizations that struggle with performing meaningful project interventions to align their project portfolio with sudden shifts in business strategy, or to support their underlying corporate culture as it shifts toward more rapid innovation, originality, adaptability, engagement, collaboration and efficacy.

In such fluid business environments, our original medical metaphor doesn’t fully apply; triage and diagnosis were performed from a perspective of project internals.  In today’s world, the old project success indicators can be very much out of sync with the business.  If IT projects, the project portfolio, and a PMO are not accountable in terms of their value to the business, it’s time to change the ways we think and talk about projects, and begin to define new KPI’s for success.

  • First of all, let’s stop using the term scope creep.  To deliver business value, the project organization must be agile enough to rapidly address scope fluidity. Would it make more sense to measure how quickly a project team can replan/re-estimate a shift in scope?
  • Quality metrics may also need to fall by the wayside. Is the current release good enough to push into production with defects noted, and expectations managed–think of the release as a minimum viable product, like lean startups do?
  • In rapidly changing businesses, it’s very difficult to plan out a 12 month milestone plan for IT projects. It makes more sense to define a backlog of objectives at the beginning of the planning phase, and perform rolling prioritization, with the complete expectation that the prioritization will change at multiple points during the coming year. In such an environment, how meaningful is it to judge project success against the old notion of “on time”?

In the context of all of this change, it is no longer reasonable to judge projects based on their internal conditions. The measures of project success in today’s world lie in the greater business context.

  • Has the project or project portfolio enabled the business to respond to threats and opportunities more rapidly?
  • Has it increased our innovation speed?
  • Even if the application is buggy, has it improved overall efficiency, enhanced the quality of goods and services, reduced operating costs, or improved the business’ relationship to its customers?

While these questions have answers that are less quantifiable, they are certainly more meaningful in today’s business context. How is your business evaluating project success these days?

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