The Lake of Unclear Benefits

lake of unclear benefits

Source: harrypotter.wikia.com

So the decision comes down, your company is moving forward with new ERP. Congratulations on your decision; just remember, a year or so from now, that ERP implementations are potentially the next great, bloody spectator sport. They are not for the weak or those lacking determination. Decision made, presumably based upon a business case that documented the expected benefits and how you are going to get there. If so, continue. If not, then you’d probably better back up a bit and get all of your bunnies in a row because, in either case, now you have to communicate why you are doing this project.

So whom do you have to communicate with? How about: anyone who will be impacted by this project. Certainly that includes directly impacted end-users and their supervision and management. It also includes people in other organizations that may not be included in the initial project, this might be HR or some other organizaton. Why communicate with them? Because they will hear about the project and will naturally have questions about it, including why they are being included in the scope of the change, especially if they are unhappy with current systems and processes.

What needs to be communicated at this early stage? Frankly, it does not have to be complicated. It almost always begins with “We are moving to new ERP because…” and then you simply fill in the blank. This is also a good time to develop a good 15-20 second answer. Why? To get the key points across quickly. That said, you absolutely MUST be ready to provide details regarding what specific goals exist, by area/location, and how you expect to get there. Elevator speeches can only go so far – it takes details to calm people who are fearful of change.

We actually get asked frequently, “why do we have to communicate so early about the reasons for our new ERP project?” Our answer is pretty simple: because if you don’t, people will fill in the blank themselves. And you won’t believe what they will come up with, most of it from the depths of fear, distrust, or native suspicion. Here’s what we’ve heard people come up with:

So, why are they doing this to us (again)?

To get the company ready to sell (and all of us are going to lose our jobs)

To increase automation and efficiency (and all of us are going to lose our jobs)

Here we go again, more churn, churn, churn and someone else gets the butter (and we are all going to lose our jobs)

Get the point? If you don’t provide a good answer in advance, people will answer their own questions in the most negative possible way.

Your communication of the reasons or rationale for moving to new ERP is merely the start of a good communication strategy and plan – not the end of it. Oh, yeah, if you don’t have a comprehensive communication strategy and plan, it is most definitely time to get one. And for pity’s sake, if you don’t know how to do this, call someone who does. Everyone who depends on the future ERP system will eventually be grateful.

Lack of concerted communication to end-users about the reasons behind the implementation, the anticipated benefits stemming from successful adoption and the ways in which each individual end-user and executive are impacted will affect project success or failure.

Mitigation Step: Create and follow a comprehensive organizational change management plan – at the very least, get an expert involved to do an assessment of readiness and challenges.

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