Does your PMO get in the way of your Agile Development Teams?

Do your agile teams have your PMO pulling their collective hair out in frustration?

A family in harmony will prosper in everything. ~ Chinese Proverb

Does this sound familiar:

We value face-to-face conversation We need formal, written documents
Working software is our primary measure of progress Where is your status report?
How are you progressing against your project plan?
Self-Organizing Teams Defined Roles and Responsibilities
Individuals and Interactions Processes and Tools
Respond to Change Follow a Plan
Culture of Change Culture of Order

You’ve embraced an agile development methodology, empowered your teams, and they are eager to move forward.  They want to deliver a quality product to the organization as quickly as possible.  They want to add value and make a difference.

Your project management office (PMO) understands and supports the agile development approach, but they still need to manage the overall project portfolio and they want to be sure that the agile teams deliver in alignment with the organization’s strategic objectives.  They want to add value and make a difference.

Both groups have the organization’s best interests in mind, but there is a definite culture clash.

Agile teams can be dismissive of the PMO. Their approach is different, they don’t need to worry about those processes and frameworks; they just need to focus on their own project.  The PMO should get out of their way.  It reminds me of a teenager who wants their parents to just leave them alone – until the parent is needed.

PMOs can act like a dictatorial parent.  They can demand process and procedure from agile teams because that is what they’ve always done.  But process and procedure that doesn’t add value does get in the way.

Both groups need to respect each other and adapt.

Just like the parent of a teenager, the PMO should be loosening the rules and allowing greater freedom while demanding accountability (and standing by with a safety net). The PMO has to adapt itself to the agile world,  working with the agile teams to understand the tools that they are using to manage and control the agile project.  It should adapt these tools to their use rather than making the agile team use the same old PMO provided reports and templates.

The agile team, like the teenager, also needs to acknowledge and respect the role of the PMO.  The project and the project team aren’t operating in a vacuum.  It needs to fit into the larger organizational plan and processes.  So the agile team needs to fit itself into the framework that the PMO has established.  That may mean complying with certain project checkpoints or processes, such as conducting a formal risk analysis or establishing a milestone-level, project plan, budget, and scope.

If each can recognize that the other is not purposely trying to obstruct them and understand the value of the other to the organization, they should be able to leverage on another’s strengths.  While there may still be friction and areas of disagreement, the end result should be a set of processes that improve project outcomes and ensure alignment with overall organizational objectives.

2 thoughts on “Does your PMO get in the way of your Agile Development Teams?

  1. Pingback: Projects are like a box of chocolates | Edgewater Blog

    • We do not, we collaborate with our clients and their PMOs to establish a methodology that is appropriate for the situation.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s